Major Works to Tackle Sewer Flooding in Giffnock

13 June 2022
Scottish Water will begin a long-awaited project to help tackle sewer flooding in Giffnock, East Renfrewshire as schools close for summer. 

From Monday 27 June, Braidholm Road will be closed to through traffic from Merryton Avenue to Merrylee Park Avenue for 12 months with local diversions in place. There will be no parking, however, pedestrian access will be maintained. Access will be maintained to Braidbar Farm Road and Park Grove Avenue via traffic lights during this time.
View of Braidholm Road Giffnock

Braidholm Road

The work will hep alleviate flooding in Braidholm Road, Giffnock. 

“It means the world to me that this project is going ahead. Every time it rains my heart is in my mouth watching the water pouring down the hill and the water levels rising. The concern that the sewers are going to erupt yet again is just awful. ”

Bridget Curran
Local Resident
The project is anticipated to take around 13 months for completion and involves the installation of an underground storage tank beneath the grassed open space on the south side of Braidholm Road next to its junction with Whitton Drive and Graffham Avenue.

From Monday 27 June 2022 until October 2022, access to Braidbar Farm Road and Park Grove Avenue will be eastbound along Braidholm Road.

From October 2022 until June 2023, access to Braidbar Farm Road and Park Grove Avenue will be westbound along Braidholm Road.

Temporary traffic management plans have been agreed in liaison with East Renfrewshire and Glasgow City councils 

Planning has been submitted for a satellite site compound to be situated adjacent to the car park of Glasgow Hutchesons’ Aloysians (GHA) rugby club. 

Once installed the new tank will alleviate pressure on the existing waste water network during extreme weather events, providing capacity for extra stormwater storage. The water will then be pumped back into the network when capacity allows.

Scottish Water recently hosted an information event in the local community to explain the project to residents, how it will help tackle flooding in the area and how it might impact them when the work is actually under way.

Georgina Reid, Corporate Affairs manager in the west, said: “Inevitably, with any project of this nature some disruption is unavoidable but we will continue to work with local residents to address any concerns or issues they might have.

“Road traffic management will be in place to enable these works to be delivered safely. We recognise this will bring some disruption for local residents and road users in the area but we will do all we can to ensure any disruption is minimised where possible. 

“This major project is a priority for us and we hope that people will be understanding and appreciate just how much of a difference it will make for our customers who currently experience the misery and distress of sewer flooding.”

Bridget Curran, one of the local residents who has had first-hand experience of sewer flooding for many years, welcomed the project.

She said: “It means the world to me that this project is going ahead. Every time it rains my heart is in my mouth watching the water pouring down the hill and the water levels rising. The concern that the sewers are going to erupt yet again is just awful. 

“I have every sympathy for the people that will be affected by or be concerned about road closures while the work takes place but I hope that people who aren’t as directly affected as I am will also feel they’re benefiting and be really relieved to think that there will no longer be contaminated sewage water in the public pathways. It’s for the good of everyone in the area that this is happening.”

Scottish Water will liaise with Braidbar Primary School and the construction site and compound is expected to be in place over the summer holidays, with a safe passage established for schoolchildren by the time they return in August.